Update on Issue IV

It’s been a while since I’ve made any posts. I’ve been busy writing articles and working to earn a crust.

I’m relieved to say the final article has been written and sent off for edit. Once that’s finalised, the compilation forms the magazine.

So far the magazine has been free and posting it has been rather simple. This time it won’t be free and posting it has got me stumped. WordPress is expensive, I don’t have $1200 in pocket change to splurge because they feel they need 1 year payment in advance and the plugin needed to sell on the blog. Amazon staff are offshore, they copy/paste pre written script, so it’s like talking to a recording. I know little about eBay, but it seems like it’s the last place to try.

If I knew for a certainty I would get as many purchases as I did downloads on the previous issues then I would make the investment with WordPress. Unfortunately, I don’t know and I am just as poor as the next bloke so I can’t risk it.

The price will be only US$5.00, cheap as chips considering how much work goes into it. If all goes well  I can quit my day job and do this full time, I won’t be as stressed and drained as I am. On the flip side my back is further degenerating, and it’s getting harder and harder to push the plane. Nonetheless, I’m still soldiering on and will continue to work the craft the only way I know how with my hands. There is nothing sweeter and more soul satisfying/gratifying than when you build something by hand.

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Scroll saw Tune up

This is a video on blade calibration to make it run true and vibration free. I was very nervous in the video and when I’m nervous my mind usually goes blank. Hope the video is beneficial to you.

Twisted Bandsaw Blade Culprit

Today I changed the tyres on both wheels of my bandsaw and it was an all day event. I had to travel 70km to buy it, then I had a friend show me how to put one on, got home couldn’t get the bottom wheel off, posted a help request on a forum, told I needed a wheel puller or heat the rubber and wheel to 100° C and put it on that way.

I did neither of that and just slapped it on. I will write an article on this as it is a pain in the backside to put it on, but the way my friend showed me today it makes it a little less frustrating.

When I placed the tyre on there were a few bumps which I levelled out.  So when I installed a brand new blade and saw it twisting like chubby checker I went back to re levelling any spots I may have missed on the tyre. Backwards and forwards for an hour until I was satisfied it wasn’t the tyre.  Then I had a thought and reinstalled the old blade and presto she was running true again. So now I knew that the new blade was twisted. Luckily I had one brand new blade left and installed that one, I must admit I was a bit nervous that it too may be twisted but it wasn’t and ran true.

twisted blade

Btw that picture isn’t my twisted blade, but it had half the twist of that.  There you go I learned two new things today; How to replace a tyre and bandsaw blades can have a twist in it.

Machinery absolutely without a shadow of a doubt SUCK. They are a pain in the pocket and in the backside.  Most machinery and that’s not including Hammer or Laguna are made cheaply and carelessly in China. You all know that you don’t need me to tell you this but what you may not probably know is it’s not China’s fault. They will make to the standards companies are willing to pay for and that’s not very much.

I use that bandsaw maybe twice a week for re sawing thicker stock into thinner ones and no more than 5mins for those two times combined. Both tyres snapped from wear and tear and I have to express my disappointment in that. Imagine I had a machine only wood shop. Imagine I relied on that machine to work all day everyday. Imagine I had to buy new tyres every month because they’re so poorly made under the direct instruction of companies to keep their costs down.  I worked it out for the length of time I had to an average time I used it and it came 40mins.  I used that bandsaw over the years of a total of 40mins and let’s be gracious and add another 20 mins to that in case I made a mistake. I think enough is enough and it really is time to fight back.  If it’s made in China piss it off, walk away. Rather be without it than throw your money away.

As for me I will be in the near future building myself a Roubo saw. She will last as long as I last and will continue to work when the next person picks it up. Bugger machinery, they may work faster for a moment and then something will break down and she’ll go on strike bringing production to a grinding halt and put you out of pocket for a month. Remember it was the tortoise that won the race and not the hare.

Correction on “software”

Last night’s post has been bugging me when I used the term “software”. I may have been a little over zealous with this word and I don’t want to appear to be something that I’m not.  I think the internet already has enough of those.

It’s an excel file I’m working on. In my eyes it behaves like basic software and the code I’m writing for it which I know is easy stuff for developers is not so easy for me. So that’s why I used the term software.

No, no one wrote to me and asked about it, it just weighed heavily on my mind.

Thickness,Width,Length or L,W,T?

As the internet has brought the world closer, we’re realising that we have not-so-subtle differences after all. We may speak the same language but we don’t spell exactly the same. We don’t use the same terminology of certain words, nor the same measurements, nor even how we write it down in our cut lists. It is as if we are an entirely different race that has no brethren bloodline at all.
Let me give you one example. Lumber in the US means milled timber and timber in England and its conquered nations referred to as the commonwealth refer to timber as milled timber, in fact Lumber is seldom used in England or any commonwealth nation except for Canada. Let me give you one more; in the US you would say 2×4 but in Australia you would reverse it and say 4×2.
I can live with all of that but what I find difficult to live with is the reading order of the US version T,W,L (Thickness, Width, Length). I don’t know about Europe as I have no cut lists from there but I know here in Australia and I suspect England to be the same we write L,W,T.  Now that makes sense.

American Version

46-49_ToolCabinet.indd

Australian Version

oz_cut-list
I’ve tried doing research on the topic to find out the history of why and came up empty. So my take on it is this and correct me if I am wrong. The timber/lumber yards felt they did not need to read to L,W,T because that was not the order they were working in. All they needed to know was the thickness and its width, the length was the least of their concern.  So I believe somewhere along the line some dumb arse followed the timber yards and changed what was unnatural for cabinetmakers to adopt but adopt they did.  I have tried adopting the US method and I seem to get confused every time because in my mind I’m reading it backwards.  Think about it; Do we ever thickness first? No, it’s always the length, then width. Maybe in the machine world they thickness their timber first, but in the hand tool world unless your a gym junkie you wouldn’t.
This has become an issue for me since I’ve written this software called Project Price Estimator. I started this at the beginning of last year and got side tracked and have just returned to it. I was looking at the cut list and ordered it as L,W,T but I thought the US would struggle with it written like as I struggle to read their way of writing it. The thing is I don’t know if I will ever release it to the public but it’s so cool and I know you would love it and use it everyday.  This software is the most honest bloody software on the market. I’ll give you one example, it doesn’t calculate you buying a gallon of finish, it calculates on the amount of finish used on the project at hand and the same is applied to glue, screws, nails and other fixtures including your workshop expenses like electricity, phone, rent etc, and at the very end of it all it tells you how much your build is worth.  How many times have you asked yourself and your partner what’s it worth? Well now you’ll know.
Let me know what you think of my theory.  There has to be a reason why they changed the order around.

P.S. Issue IV is currently WIP (Work in Progress) I’m not sure of it’s release date due to work commitments.  More on it closer to it’s release.

Hodges Mitre Shoot 1890

Many aids and appliances for frame making and for making correct mitre joints have been given to the working public of late years, and the latest addition to their number has been Hodges Mitre Shoot, which is illustrated in Fig.2, and which is intended for planing up the joint after the wood has been cut to the proper shape by the means of the saw. The patent rights are held by Mr. E.R. Sibley, Whites Hill, near Gloucestershire, who, I am sure, will readily answer any question regarding the price at which the machine is sold, and respecting which I am utterly in the dark. I like to be in a position to mention the price of everything I am called on to notice, for to know the cost of an article is useful to buyer, seller, reader, and myself all round, and, in many cases, saves the putting of questions on this point and the answering of the same.  The nature of the machine will be seen from the illustration. First, there is a rectangular frame or bed, with raised edges or guards, which is fixed firmly to the edge of the workbench, as shown by two screws. Attached to the frame is an adjustable bed, whose inclination forms an angle of 45° with the frame, and on this frame the moulding is placed after bring cut, in the mitre block, and secure by the vice, which grips it and retains it in position, the vice itself working in a small block attached to the adjustable bed. When the moulding is in position, the end may be planed up with the long plane shown in the illustration, and which is made of so great a length that it may be able to ride on guards formed by the raised edges of the frame and the top of the bed itself.  As these guards are perfectly flat and square, it follows that the end of the moulding, when planed up, must be equally flat and square, The bed, as it

hodges-mitre-shoot

has been said, is adjustable, and should it deviate from the proper angle, it can be set correctly by loosening a screw at the back of the regulator, bringing it parallel with the sides of the machine, and then tightening the screw again. The regulator is at the bottom of the bed, and does not appear in the illustration. The points of utility claimed for the machine are, its capability of producing accurate work; causing no injury to mouldings; perfect adjustment by means of its rising and falling bed; the ease with which it can be worked; the possibility of reshooting the ends of a frame after two sides have been joined together; and its portability and the ease with which it is fixed. The machine takes moulding 4 in. and 3 in. deep.