Tip – Locate holes for your vice

The heading is a little misleading as I don’t know the correct word for it, but the picture will put you in the know as to what I’m referring too.

viceI’ve been cleaning up my bench top, you know flattening it and taking out as many scores as I could.  This morning I decided to replace the timber on my vice and locating the holes with the vice installed got me stumped for a good 5 mins.  Measuring in from the side and top was an option, but then I remembered I had these dowel centre finders, but they were a little too small and kept falling out.  So I used masking tape to temporarily hold them in place while I pricked the board.  It takes the guess work out of locating the holes which may lead to potential misalignment.

old-bench

Now isn’t she pretty.  I couldn’t take out all the knife marks, chisel marks and drill holes and but she looks better than what she was before. I’m such a pig of a woodworker.

Time for a new decent workbench is long overdue and I’m going to start saving up for it. I know it’s going to be close to 2 metres long, space permitting.  I also know I want a tail vice and since I’ve never built one I rightly don’t know if I should attempt it or just buy this neat little one from HNT Gordon.

HNT-12203-1 It looks OK and I reckon it will do the trick, but I think a traditional vice would suit me better.  To make moulding planes I can clamp them them vertically, also if I needed to bore a hole in the end grain I can clamp them vertically.  For carving  they also work like a dream and I’m sure I would find many more uses for it.  But there’s a catch I won’t be able to install another face vice  as the tail vice will be in the way for re sawing or clamping large panels.  Having a bandsaw suffices 99% of my re sawing needs, but what about those wide panels where it’s too wide for a bandsaw?  I may have to make a small bench just for that like the one Roubo shows, but that also means eating up precious shop space for something that won’t be used on a regular basis unless I sell my bandsaw which I don’t foresee that happening in this life or the next. In fact, I’ll take it with me to the afterlife, that’s how useful that machine is.  The only two useful machines I have in my shop is my lathe and bandsaw.  I don’t ever use my portable thicknesser and I don’t know why I still have it.

I will keep the current going through the lathe until I can figure out how to make a treadle lathe spin 2000 rpm.  I’ve seen many foot powered lathes work and I don’t how people are not frustrated with it.  Greg Merritt recently built his and he’s having a ball with it, but who knows maybe if I tried one I too would like it.

Here is a picture of a model bench I found on the net I would like to base mine on.

bench2-web

Lastly on vices, I still haven’t decided if I should make one or buy one with a quick release. My current vice is a quick release dawn, but it’s making a clicking sound since I did that glue test of trying to snap the board with it.  Amazing isn’t it how strong this glue is.  Ever since I figured out that it needs thinning it’s been my go to glue.

I’ve been blogging a lot lately and that’s because I’ve had three weeks off work. Sadly I haven’t won the lottery to make it permanent so I’m back on this weekend.  I won’t be as active as I was but that’s life ain’t it.

Just to let you know I still have a fair way to go in finishing Issue III. I’m going to include the moulding planes build which I hope you will enjoy.  I’ve been reading some of the comments people are writing about the magazine on other forums.  Many people like it, but there are some who want a magazine that’s written for advanced woodworkers.  I have always stated from the very beginning at opening this blog that I’m not catering towards the beginners.  However, I do realize that we were all beginners at one stage and I should and will cater for all.  In truth, there is only so much one can write about the craft before you end up repeating yourself.  What I don’t want to do is write about how to saw, or using reference edges for your squares.

I have included many useful articles in the magazine about various topics.  I understand not every topic would be of interest to everyone and advanced or not you will learn something new. I know I have and still do everyday.  The topics written by me are my own experiences and findings I have learned and discovered over the years through use, the topics written by others are their own and the topics written by our ancients are the most experienced and most beneficial to us.  I have said this in the past, who can know more about working with their hands than those guys who worked it everyday 150 years and more ago.  That’s why I put them in and will continue to do so as long as this magazine is active.

I will include many projects from clock making to building furniture.  I’m not a wonder boy but I will do the best I can.  However, finding new contributing authors has proven to be more difficult than I had previously thought.  I thank Greg, Brian and Josh for their contributions and I also thank Matt for his contributions.  These guys really gave it all they had for the love of the craft.  “Give and you shall receive.”  I would love women to also contribute articles, I know according to the statistics on this blog and my YouTube account that it’s only 3% that are actively viewing.  I’m sure this percentage is probably larger elsewhere and if it is why not showoff  your skills and contribute.

One last final point I really need to make clear.  I’m not interested in portraying myself as a know it all.  I know people on YouTube and other blogs where they are deriving an income from it, have to make themselves appear that they are flawless and a walking encyclopedia of woodworking knowledge.  I never want to head down that road irrespective I’m making money from the craft or not. I think that image portrayal is bullshit, it’s the biggest load of crock and I don’t want it.  I’m me, I’m down to earth, I’m honest, hard working and fallible. I make mistakes like everyone else and I certainly don’t know everything, but I learn something new everyday. I want to be the best I can be and genuinely want the same for you.

So there it is in a nutshell, nothing is perfect, no one is perfect and this magazine is not perfect, but I did pour my heart and soul into it. If given the financial resources and time to put into it, I know I could make it better.

Is that wishful thinking, I wonder.

 

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4 thoughts on “Tip – Locate holes for your vice

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