How to Replace a Battery Powered Movement

I’ve had this clock for a while that my daughter bought for my birthday some years ago. The movement died and since I have many movements left from my previous clock making days; I thought it would be a great opportunity to demonstrate on how to replace a battery powered movement.

Remove pin

This is the pin that holds the hands on the movement. Not all clocks have pins some are nuts (open and closed). Pull this out with your fingers to remove the hands.

Remove nut

This is the nut that holds the movement on the face. It is only finger tight. Unscrew the nut and pop the movement out.

Movement

The movement I’m replacing is a cheap Chinese-made movement. They cost around 0.30cents to buy in bulk from alibaba and only last about 3 years. They are good if you want to build a reputation for producing rubbish. For battery powered movements you need to buy the best there is, and Takane movements are it. They are made in the USA and come with a warranty of 10 years, even though they can last longer than that. They cost around $22 each, which is significantly higher than the Chinese model, but you get what you pay for.

Insert the shaft through the hole, replace the washer and screw on the nut using finger tight pressure only.

The plastic shaft on the movement which holds the hour hand isn’t the same diameter as the hole in the hour hand, I have to make some adjustments to reduce its diameter. I will hammer the outer walls of the hole inwards.

Hammer the outer wall of the hole inwards to reduce its diameter.

Reinsert the hands and screw on the nut. Discard the pin that came with the previous movement.

I discarded the metal hands altogether and make some new ones from wood I had left over from the jewellery box project I made for my niece.

Have you ever wondered why many clocks for sale read 1:50? It’s an old psychological trick that sellers still use to make their clocks seem more attractive. It’s a smile and meant to make you feel good when you look at the clock in the shop’s window. You’ll never see a clock reading 8:20 as that represents a frowning face.

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