Starrett 1895-1948

starrett 1895

starrett 1938

starrett 1948

starrett no.16 supplement

This is the last of the catalogues I’m going to post unless I find one dated back to the 18th century which I don’t even know if they actually had toolmakers who made tools as a business. Generally woodworkers and blacksmiths made tools for themselves and the latter for woodworkers.  Anyhow, I feel the catalogues I posted is more than enough.

Small Router Plane Build

I’ve finally settled on a design and finished the build, after much debate within myself and squeezing every ounce of energy out of me it’s finally done.  Working 14 hours a day in my regular job believe me this wasn’t easy, but my passion for the craft is what’s driven to complete it.

I needed to make a new router plane to aid me in completing the moulding planes, the small Veritas router plane I do have doesn’t suffice.  First the blade isn’t long enough to reach a 2 inch depth and the plane isn’t wide enough to comfortably work with it. Lastly the blade is 1/4 inch wide which makes too wide for the mouth opening.  So I decided I needed to make myself one to suit the job at hand.

Initially I started on this one below, I grabbed some scrap Walnut for the base and Rosewood for the handle from a previous clock build I did.  For the blade I used an allen key, bent it the correct angle, flattened the bottom and polished and sharpened the blade.  I also used a screw to lock the blade in it’s position.  Well it worked and to my surprise not only did the allen key sharpen really well but it’s ability to hold to an edge was really surprising.  I researched on what type of metal it is but unfortunately I don’t know because different makers use different metals which are a closely guarded secret.

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I couldn’t stop there, I was now hit with the creativity bug, I needed to make a schmick looking one and it had to resemble a period looking one, so I went cracking at it.

I started drawing it up in autocad and built a prototype.  Drawing it up is one thing but actually building it is completely another kettle of fish.  The dimensions I chose didn’t actually work so I went back to cad to come up with new dimensions.  The problem with drawing on the computer is that your screen isn’t 1:1 ratio so you end up zooming in spacing things apart to what looks good to your eye but ends up being all wrong come time to the actual build.  Even though using software for drawing is awesome especially when you want to find dead centres or mirroring object and especially erasing a line is fantastic as there are no smudges on paper but hand drawing I can definitely see the benefits in that when you draw 1:1.  There are renowned woodworkers who will draw an entire piece 1:1 scale on a sheet of plywood, now I see why they would.

Anyway I went backwards and forwards with it trying to come up with a design that aesthetically looked pleasing to the eye and had that period feel to it and functioned well.

Finally I came up with one I thought would work well, I turned some knobs and did some carving on it but they ended being too small and had a clumsy feel to it.  So I went back to cad and started a new design.  After spending much time on it mostly due to work always getting in the way I finally came up with a design that would work well.

I turned  some knobs with brass inserts, I also turned blade holder and added a nice brass knurled screw.  I added a 1.5mm thick brass plate to the bottom to keep the base indefinitely flat and it looks good as well.  I didn’t use epoxy  because you don’t use epoxy for gluing metal to wood as you see it plastered all over youtube instead, I used loctite 330 which costs horrendously, ridiculously and stupidly expensive for a small tube of it.  I would like to thank Terry Gordon from HNT tools for his advice on this and my dear friend in the US, Tony Konovaloff who wrote the book Chisel, Mallet, Plane and Saw for inspiring me to push myself and to never give up.  Love you bro

The plane measures 3 1/8 x 3 9/16 x 29/32 ( 79.3mm x 90.5mm x 23mm) the iron is O1 tool steel 1/8 inch round and reaches a depth of 2 inches, it’s been heat treated to RC 62.  The body of the plane is Black Walnut with a brass plate, the tool holder for a lack of a better word is Camphor Laurel and the knobs are Beech with brass inserts.  The plate has been ground flat.

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I have one more brass plate left, I will make one more with a 4mm O1 blade and offer it for sale, the first plane I would like to give away all I ask is that you pay the postage of $25 if it’s more I’ll wear the difference,  you can email me the first person that sends it will be the first to get it.  Send me your full address details and payment through paypal.

To send money through paypal follow the descriptions below.

  1.  Log in to your paypal account if you don’t have one then create one
  2. On the top Tab choose “money” and click on it
  3. In the left hand column you will now see “send or request money” click on that
  4. You will now see 5 boxes choose the first box that reads “send money to family or friends” this one is free if you choose the second one to the right they will charge you a fee.
  5. Enter my email address, you already know it because you sent me an email if I post it here I can get spammed.
  6. That’s it.

Almost forgot this iron in this plane reaches a depth of 1.5 inches.

Building myself a tool was a challenge but the end result was great and even though it cost me more to do it myself the experience and knowledge gained was a worthwhile investment, you could say priceless.