Grinder Wheel Alignment

I recently bought a slow speed grinder as I’ve grown beyond weary sharpening A2 steel entirely by hand. If my plane irons were thin Stanley O1 blades, then I would never need a grinder even if the blade was nicked. However, it is what it is and life goes on.

With every new grinder or with every new wheel replacement, you will need to balance or align the wheels. You also may have to periodically balance the wheels throughout the life of the wheel due to dressing, wear and profiling. The balancing of grinding wheels is essential despite dressing them! Skipping this step may cause chatter marks, excessive wheel wear and spindle head wear to name but a few.

When you start the grinder, you may notice that the wheel has a slight wobble. This can be due to the large flange washers not running true. Fixing this isn’t as difficult or time consuming as you may think.

First turn the machine on and look at the wheel to see if there is a wobble. The chances are high that there will be. If there is, turn the machine off, unplug it from the wall, wait for the wheels to stop turning and take the covers off.

Make a reference mark on each flange washer and the wheel to record their original location.

Next, loosen the shaft nut and rotate the flange washer clockwise and the other wheel counter clockwise by ½”.

Tip: If the wheel is new, you may notice the flange washer won’t rotate due to it being stuck to the paper. I used the tip of a flat blade screwdriver to strike the flange washer, a light tap is all that is needed to unstick it from the paper.

Tighten the shaft nut by hand and rotate the wheel by hand. If you don’t feel confident that you will observe any change, then tighten the shaft nut and turn the machine on. If there is still wobble in the wheel, turn it another ½”. Keep doing this until you’re satisfied. You could spend an eternity finding that sweet spot, but at some point you will have to stop and say it’s good enough for my purpose. A small amount of wobble is fine.

The final step is to dress the wheel. The centre bushings “roughly” centre the wheel on the shaft. Inaccuracies in the manufacturing process may cause fluctuation in the wheel and to address this, a wheel dresser can be used to make the wheel run true.

Place the wheel dresser on the tool rest angled upwards with the edge of the wheel dresser facing the wheel. Slowly bring the wheel dresser to the stone until you hear the untrue side touch the dresser. As you apply light pressure, the face of the stone becomes true.

Some things to be aware of:

The left side shaft nut has left-handed threads and so the nut is tightened counter clockwise. The right-side shaft nut has right-handed threads and is tightened by rotating it clockwise.

Do not over tighten the shaft nuts. Doing so can cause damage to the wheel and the flange washers. A light touch is all that is needed. The direction of travel will keep the nuts tight.

When buying a new wheel make sure the R.P.M. rating is greater than the grinder’s motor. The outer diameter of the wheel must be according to the size specification of your grinder. The bore diameter of the wheel must be the same as the original wheel.

Do not remove the labels on the sides of the wheels. They help to spread the holding pressure of the tightened nuts on the grinding wheel flanges.

Applying the entire face of the wheel dresser to the stone without the support of a tool rest may introduce deeper grooves and further untrue the stone.

Troubleshooting as is in the manual

If the adjustment of the flange washers does not make the wheel run without side to side oscillation, then remove the wheel and flange washers and check the shoulder on the motor shaft at the point where the flange washer seats against it. A slight burr on the edge of the shoulder can stop the flange washer from seating properly. The burr can be removed using a file to smooth the edge of the shoulder. Look for any roughness on the surfaces of the flange washers and smooth these spots on sandpaper placed on a flat surface. Then replace the wheel, re-adjust the flange washers, and dress the wheel.

With wheels properly aligned,this is a wonderful machine that serves its purpose in eliminating the drudgery of sharpening A2 plane blades. With the further aid of an after-market tool rest, you’ll have one powerful addition to your sharpening tool kit.

Dominos Case

I loved playing dominos with my dad when I was young and I still love playing dominos with my dad and now my son. I introduced him to the game not long ago, and he loves it. The box that the dominos came in was getting a bit tattered, so I decided to make for my old man a nice new one. I guess the original is a vintage box now and probably worth something so if anyone wants it before it goes in the bin let me know. I’m taking all the measurements off the original box and will provide them for you here.  My choice of timbers is NGR (New Guinean rosewood) for the sides and American black walnut for the ends, top and bottom.

Sides 8” x 2 1/4” x ¼” (make 2)

Ends 2 3/4” x 2 1/4” x ¼ (make 2)

Bottom 8 x 2 3/4” x 1/8” (make 1)

Lid undetermined yet – we’ll get to that part later (make 1).

Start by preparing the parts.  Rip the sides and ends over-sized.  Flatten one side and plane one edge and end square.  From the reference edge, mark 2 1/4” and rip and plane to the line.  From the reference end, mark the overall length, square a line around the piece and crosscut to the line.  Finally, mark and plane to final thickness.

In the photo below, you’ll see the two ends have been prepared as a single piece, to be cut apart and cut to length later.

Plough a ¼” wide, 1/8” deep groove that is 1/8” from the upper edge on the inside of the side pieces.  The lid will slide in these grooves. It’s imperative that the two side pieces are of equal width. If one of those pieces were wider than the other, the grooves could be out of alignment with each other.

When adjusting the plough plane, it can be helpful first to scribe a gauge line on the workpiece 1/8” from the upper edge.  Rather than setting the plane’s fence with a ruler, line up the left edge of the blade to the gauge line.

Using a rule, set the depth stop 1/8” from to the tip of the blade and lock it in place.  Verify the distance one more time for good measure.

If the wood has reversing grain, set the iron to take a very light cut. You’re only ploughing to 1/8” depth so it won’t take long.
Using a sticking board with an adjustable fence can help in ploughing the grooves. If you’re interested in making your own sticking board, plans are available in Issue IV, which can be purchased from my store. With an adjustable fence, making the piece flush against the edge of the sticking board is easy and this gives a much better surface for the plough plane’s fence to ride along.

Following these tips should result in clean, accurate results every time.

The box will have single dovetails at each corner.

Make the tails protrude by about 1/32” by setting a marking gauge to slightly more than the thickness of the pin board, as in the above picture.  Use that setting to mark the baselines on the tail board.

One end of the box will be higher than the other so that the lid can slide in and stop.  For this reason, the dovetails will be offset from centre.

On the end grain of a side piece, measure in ¼” from the lower edge and 5/8” from the grooved edge.  At these locations, mark lines straight across the end, then extend lines down the faces to the baselines using the dovetail angle you prefer.

Cut away the waste and pare to the lines to complete the dovetail.

To transfer the tails to the pin board, use a trick from Mike Pekovic of Fine Woodworking Magazine. He uses painter’s masking tape on the edge of the pin board (as shown above).  Knifing the outlines of the dovetail onto the pin board and removing the tape in the waste area reveals very clean, visible lines.

This is especially useful on dark timbers like this walnut.  Saw and chisel out the waste and fit the tail board to the pin board.

To allow the lid to slide in and out, one of the ends will be reduced in height.

Choose an end to be the front and knife a mark from the lower wall of the groove onto the end piece. Extend the mark across the end piece and rip and plane to the line.

Reassemble the box and verify that the top edge of the end piece is flush with the bottom of the grooves.  When satisfied, glue the box together, clamp it up and check for square.

When the glue has set, pare the protruding ends. Plane as close as possible to the surface and finish it off by paring with a chisel.

Flatten the bottom using a plane or by rubbing on sandpaper adhered to a flat surface.

Just a few strokes is all that is needed.

Prepare the bottom piece, planing to about 1/8” thick, but keeping the length and width oversized.  Glue the box to it and when the glue has dried, plane the ends and sides flush with the box.

The box can be clamped in a vice to give good even clamping pressure all around.

All that’s left now is the lid.

For the lid, prepare ¼” thick stock.  Then plane the edges to fit into the grooves.

A shooting board saves a lot of time and minimizes potential errors in making the edges parallel.

The fit shouldn’t be too sloppy or too tight. There should be just enough slack so the lid can slide in and out freely but not so free that if tipped on its end it will slide out.

With the lid slid all the way to the back of the box, place a mark on the lid at the end of a groove.  Square the mark across the lid and crosscut to length.  The lid will have a lip added to it that will hide the two grooves on the ends and will also act as a pull to open the box.

Rip a small piece whose width is equal to the difference between the height of the front end and the height of the sides.  This measurement can be obtained as shown in the picture above.  The length of the piece should be slightly greater than the width of the box.

Glue the lip onto the end grain of the lid, ensuring the bottoms of the lip and lid are flush with each other.  Gluing end grain to long grain may not be as strong as gluing long grain to long grain, but if the end grain is coated with glue and allowed to dry, the lip can be glued as normal and the bond will be strong. This applies to all types of glue.  When attaching the lip, ensure that the ends on both sides are slightly proud of the box sides. Trim them flush to the sides after the glue has dried.

That’s all there is to it. The box is now ready for light sanding and finish. I used three coats of shellac, followed by a coat of paste wax.

While computer games become out dated almost as quickly as they are released, dominos has continued to be played by friends and families since the Song Dynasty in China (1232-1298). 

The pictures below show the original box and the new box.  What a difference!

17th Century Style Shoe Rack

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I’m a fan of carved projects be that furniture, boxes, clocks, etc.  I haven’t attempted to try carving the fancy stuff from the 18th century but one of these days soon I will, God willing.  So, I’ve started off with the 17th century which I like very much.

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In comparison to the shoe rack I initially made for my wife some years back which is different to the one made for Issue 7 of the magazine, you can see by the side-by-side comparison it’s much larger and heftier. My wife is heavily into fitness training so you can see all her running shoes. Maybe one day soon I will sign up to the gym and hopefully build up some strength again for woodworking.

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I guess that isn’t a great photo to show off the sides, but when I make another one I’ll do a better shot. I used 1 1/4″ cut nails to nail the battens. I realised that it would’ve been better aesthetically had I used rose head wrought nails. On the next one I make that’s what I will be using.

wrought nail

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Here is another shot of the same side in case it comes up better on your monitors. Every monitor is different so visual appearances are also different. To be somewhat closer to period correctness I should’ve used Red oak. I definitely don’t have red oak in this thickness nor pockets deep enough to afford it. I know Follansbee has access to green logs of red oak and what seems to be he has an endless supply; I don’t. So my choice was limited to pine. Pine worked out fine for this type of carving, but I wouldn’t recommend it for the fancy 18th century style of carving. Let’s just say the wood misbehaves.

I was thinking about putting a dark stain on it, but thought it may ruin it by giving it muddy look.  I will experiment though and just put this theory to test.

For now, I have a new project I was commissioned for which may end up in the upcoming issue of The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK Magazine. I hope you’ve all enjoyed Issue 7.

 

Working Hard on Issue VII

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I can’t believe we’re already on the seventh Issue. I’ve been at it hard, building, photographing and writing and Matt’s been at it even harder trying to make sense of my words, but it’s all for you guys and gals. It’s the love of the craft, but more importantly it’s our love for sharing knowledge that continues to motivate us. There’s no monetary incentive for either of us, just sheer passion.

The work bench is cluttered with tools and wood that will be the feature project in the upcoming Issue. I called it the Ottoman Shoe Shelf. It’s 15 3/4″ in height and 30’ long. It has raised panels, mortise and tenons, through wedged tenons, scroll work, grooves for the panels etc. It will challenge you.  I have really taken a liking to ancient Arabian furniture and will build more similar items based on that theme in the future. The shoe shelf is not a copy of any historically based shoe shelf, instead it’s my design.

I cannot say for sure when the next issue will be released because of work, but all I can say is I’m working hard and Matt’s working hard to get it done, and when it’s done, we’ll start work on the issue after that.

One last thing, share the magazine with as many websites and people you can.

Cheers from down under.