My new Roubo Frame saw

As you all know, I had to modify the frame to make it easier on me to saw with it. After shortening the one arm and bringing the stretchers closer together, I didn’t know what to expect to be honest. I just didn’t know whether this would work. I impatiently started putting it together and because I was rushing, I couldn’t set it correctly. So, I left it and just started working on the finish. I applied a beautiful rosewood mahogany stain with several coats of 1 pound cut shellac and left it to dry overnight.

This morning I said to myself it’s only a saw so get a grip on yourself. I started putting it together and everything fit snugly. Pretty amazing stuff when you’re not overly excited.

Checking for twist

After putting the frame saw together, I made sure the saw blade is dead centred between the two stretchers by measuring from both sides on both ends of the saw between the saw blade and the stretchers. This is important to help you saw in a straight line. Then I tightened the saw blade by hand pressure only by turning the eye bolt. There is a high probability once you tighten the saw blade that it will place the frame in twist and therefore the saw will also be in twist. This is why you need to check for twist before you use the saw. If you use a screwdriver to lever the tightening of the saw blade, you risk snapping the frame or really putting a lot of twist in it. I found the saw works perfectly fine with the saw being tightened by hand pressure only. You don’t need to hear that ping like you would on a scroll saw blade.

If the blade is in twist, I can only parrot from what I have seen on video the people at the Hay’s cabinet shop did to take their frame saw out of twist. They tapped on the blade with a hammer. That’s what appeared to me but I cannot say for sure and I will send them an email and ask them if they can make a demonstration. The way I fixed the previous saw out of twist was by twisting the frame in the opposite direction. It worked but it wasn’t perfect. On this frame it is absolutely spot on which makes me less inclined to build another frame.

I gave it a test drive finally, and I immediately felt the difference. It was lighter and a lot easier to use. What surprised me the most was that the lightness didn’t make a difference in the cut’s speed. There you have it, folks. I think this saw is kick arse and more pleasure to use than a bandsaw.

Here is something else a little off the topic that I found interesting. I flattened my bench today, and I found that the side closest to me was out of flat as this is the side I use. Whilst the other side that isn’t used was dead flat. Go figure I can’t explain it. Maybe someone can explain it to me.

Looks good.

Issue III release date notice

handwork_issue3_Page_01

Finally it’s finished, all the articles completed, edited over and over again. This was a big project for me as the moulding planes article was a toughie to write about.  I needed to provide enough description without putting you to sleep and make it easy enough to follow.  I think I have accomplished both and I believe you will be able to make any h&r using a simpler method than the traditional British and American approach.  I have covered many aspects of the build and the reasoning behind the numbering system.

I’m sorry it took so long, but I think you will agree it was worth the wait.

As you can see I’ve also made some minor changes. Hope you like it.

As always I would like to thank Matt McGrane our magazine’s contributing editor. I would be lost without him.

Issue III release date is on Saturday 4th November 2017.

Yes, it is free

HANDWORK A work in Progress

This is a quick update to let you know where we’re at.   The announcement of this magazine has sparked a lot of excitement amongst our craftsman worldwide, we have gained several contributing authors, among them are Brian Holcombe, Joshua Stevens aka Mr.Chickadee, Bob Rozaieski from the Logan Cabinet Shoppe, Bob has written several articles for various woodworking magazines, one of them being finewoodworking.  Unfortunately Paul Sellers has declined to become a contributor at this time, but the door is always open should he reconsider time permitting.

I’m in talks with Colonial Williamsburg, they’re very positive about this magazine.  I know I could do alot more had work not be in the way, but that’s how the cookie crumbles.   So far there’s about 23 solid pages of great articles completed including projects.

So it’s all coming together slowly but surely, I didn’t realise just how much work goes into producing a quality magazine.  Also in addition, an ePub version will become available in the near future for iPad’s.  ePubs are an interactive eBook mag with video’s and so forth.  So I’m hoping to have two versions, the standard PDF for those without an iPad and an ePub version for iPads.  I’ll see if it’s possible to cover the android users.

Articles are being written up by our authors as we speak, mine are already done I just have a few other additions I would like to add.  I’m not entirely sure just how many pages there will be in total, I’m doing this on the fly.  Comparing to other magazines I’ve counted about 30 pages of advertising and about four actual pure woodworking articles. So I think I’m doing a pretty good job so far, no ads just pure woodworking.

Please help spread the word, help by contributing if you can, send your articles, projects pics, tips, ideas, discoveries, everyone is welcomed to contribute.

Send to handworkmagazine@gmail.com

This magazine is not about me but all about you, it’s for all of us combined.  Articles are not reserved for the privileged, like you find with other magazines.  I want the world to see craftsmen and women from all over the world, let the world see you and what you make and have to offer.  This magazine again is not reserved for celebrity woodworkers, even though they are more than welcome to contribute, but I’m more interested in the unknown woodworker, the silent achiever.  Not matter who you are, what part of the world you live in, you all have something valuable to offer.  If language is a barrier, I will help you along as best I can.  This is a community based magazine and therefore a community based effort.  Let’s make this the best and most sought out hand tool woodworking magazine together.